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This modern, vernacular home in West Virginia was built on the site of an existing holiday home. The original building was burned down, but the owners managed to salvage a positive point of view from the wreck; they would now be able to build a house in the style of the Dog Trot Houses found in Appalachia.

The Ridge House by GriD Architects

Creating a building that was in keeping with its surroundings was paramount to the owners. The new structure had to blend harmoniously with the environment. In terms of space, the home had to contain a studio, study, living room, dining room, kitchen and a master suite.

The Ridge House by GriD Architects

As both of the owners have backgrounds in art – one is an artist, the other, an art historian – the studio and study spaces were key elements in creating a successful project. And so, the building has a multifunctional aspect to it, catering for both work and home life.

The Ridge House by GriD Architects

The Ridge House by GriD Architects

To create the new vernacular home, they contacted GriD Architects who were responsible for the overall development of the project. GriD sourced all the materials locally including the sheet metal roofing and hemlock cladding. Apparently the form of the house “mimics the surrounding rock formations” and combines aesthetic with function. They baptised this new home, “The Ridge House”.

The Ridge House by GriD Architects

GriD Architects allocated space within the house according to the degree of privacy required. Personal spaces are located along the ridge, and public spaces overlook the Potomac River. Clerestory windows bring an abundance of natural light into the home, and helps contribute to solar gain during the winter.

The Ridge House by GriD Architects

With its thoughtful design, clean aesthetic, and relatively small footprint (1,200 square foot including a studio and study), the Ridge House has a rather quiet demeanour and sits peacefully among the mountain setting.

The Ridge House by GriD Architects

Similar houses include The Dogsalon from Oita, Japan which was constructed to fulfil both home and work functions, and this tiny house from Ireland which was built in the vernacular style.

Via Inhabitat