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This odd-looking small house can be found at Másílko – an old water reservoir that was used to supply the industrial district of Humpolec, Czech Republic. Over the years the reduced need for reservoir lead to private ownership in 1999. The new owner of the land decided to cultivate the water feature and use it as a pond.

Garden House by OK Plan Architects Contains An Unusal Tarp Shell

The newest addition to this scenic setting comes in the form of a seasonal home. Called the Garden House, and designed by OK Plan Architects, the home is designed to act as a ‘background for visitors‘.

Garden House by OK Plan Architects Contains An Unusal Tarp Shell

The home is just 42 square meters (449 square feet); pretty small. In terms of footprint, it measures 11.7 by 3.54 meters (38’4″ by 11’7″) and the high point of the roof reaches 5.5 meters (18′). From the architects:

“The ground plan is height articulated – the entrance part with social background, storeroom and bedroom is at the level of entrance to the land, the main residential premise is elevated above the dam of the pond where through the terrace and staircase it is connected with the water surface. The roof is flat, in a part with a slope. The actual roof of the cottage is a tarpaulin stretched on steel arches outside the object.”

Garden House by OK Plan Architects Contains An Unusal Tarp Shell

The buildings structure seems to be composed of mainly SIPs, although I’m not sure because the architects refer to it as “wooden sandwich structures.” Very technical.

Garden House by OK Plan Architects Contains An Unusal Tarp Shell

Overall it’s a pretty neat little home. My only gripe here is that the exterior tarp isn’t reconciled with the interior – it would have been neat to see the tent-like form from the interior, as opposed to the boxy living units.

Garden House by OK Plan Architects Contains An Unusal Tarp Shell

For more stylish small houses check out the Casey Key Guest House by Sweet Sparkman, or this modern vernacular home in West Virginia. See all small houses.

Via ArchDaily